Media Climate

February 09, 2015

EPA Moves Ahead With Water Protection Rule Despite Court Ruling

science-water ruleThe Environmental Protection Agency says it is going forward with a new federal rule to protect small streams, tributaries and  wetlands, despite a court ruling that blocked the measure in 13 central and Western states. The EPA says the rule, which took  effect Friday in more than three dozen states, will safeguard drinking water for millions of Americans.

Opponents pledged to continue to fight the rule, emboldened by a federal court decision Thursday that blocked it from Alaska to  Arkansas. “We see this (rule) as very hurtful to farmers and ranchers and we’re going to do everything to stop it politically,” said  Don Parrish of the American Farm Bureau Federation, one of several farm and business groups that have filed suit against the  regulation.

Lawsuits to block the regulation are pending across the country, and the Republican-controlled Congress has moved to thwart it.  The House has ignored a White House veto threat and passed a bill to block it, and a Senate committee has passed a measure that  would force the EPA to withdraw and rewrite it.


This June 11, 2015, photo shows a dry water ditch next to a corn field in Cordova, Md. Alex Brandon / Associated Press


Four senators who oppose the regulation said that while well-intentioned, the water rule imposes excessive burdens on small farmers and ranchers. The senators — two Democrats and two Republicans — said in an opinion column Friday that the EPA has “created considerable and potentially costly confusion for many American businesses and communities who are just trying to do their jobs well.” The column, written by Sens. Joe Donnelly, D-Ind., John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D. and Jim Inhofe, R-Okla., shows opposition to the rule comes from both parties.

The EPA counters that the rule merely clarifies which smaller waterways fall under federal protection after two Supreme Court rulings left the reach of the Clean Water Act uncertain. Those decisions in 2001 and 2006 left 60 percent of the nation’s streams and millions of acres of wetlands without clear federal protection, according to EPA, causing confusion for landowners and government officials.

The new rule would force a permitting process only if a business or landowner took steps that would pollute or destroy the affected waters — those with a “direct and significant” connection to larger bodies of water downstream that are already protected. That could include tributaries that show evidence of flowing water, for example.


In practice, the rule means that developers can no longer pave over wetlands and oil companies can no longer dump pollution into streams unhindered, restoring Clean Water Act protections to more than half the nation’s streams, supporters say. But opponents call the rule an example of federal overreach and fear a steady uptick in federal regulation of nearly every stream and ditch on rural lands.

The federal ruling Thursday was in North Dakota, where officials from that state and 12 others argued the new guidelines are overly broad and infringe on their sovereignty. The EPA said after the ruling that it would not implement the new rules in those 13 states: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Idaho, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming. Several other lawsuits from other states and farm and business groups remain.